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Are Images on Instagram More Important Than Text Content in Social Media?

It only took per year and a half to get a mobile app to have an incredible number of people’s attention, and something of these would have been a very focal fan named Mark Zuckerberg. The famous mobile app’s name is Instagram, which has been founded by two 20-something-year-old graduates from Stanford University, Kevin Systrom, and Mike Krieger.
As I continue my use of Facebook, too, I spot the shift in reach on business pages. Where a text-only update may result in a particular number of people reached (this can be without Facebook to boost posts), the crowd grows if you post a photo, and potential growth occurs people believe picture may be worth sharing. On my news feed, not just a day passes by where I don’t see a minimum of one friend sharing something George Takei has posted on his page. With close to three million fans on Facebook, Takei uses his social networking savvy to some extent for promotion and activism. Learn how to get Instagram likes and followers and boost your account – visit site.

Still, often his daily schedule involves sharing a humorous graphic. As I scroll on the screen, many are already shared tens of thousands of times. Takei is not the only one accomplishing this on Facebook, either. Oreo enjoyed a prolonged campaign of tongue in cheek photos using cookies to commemorate historical events and achievements. Despite an Internet flare-up involving a cookie with rainbow filling to observe GLBT pride, Oreo likely received a significant ROI.

What is the best industry for advertising on Instagram? These photos are getting most Instagram likes – here are the findings.


Since launching in late 2010, Instagram can claim over 30 million users, along with the interest of Facebook, which includes a bid to acquire the business for just one billion dollars. Numerous services that enable users to turn their Instagram photos into postcards, stickers, and magnets have launched within the last two years, further solidifying Instagram’s influence in mobile. Imagine Instagram disabling the like count! Why would they do that? See their explanation!


This change in power represents a chance for entrepreneurs-a sort of present-day tech gold rush. Unlike the frothiness with the late 1990s, the Internet has matured as a platform and grow ubiquitous in every household and so on every cell phone. The catch 22 here is that there is a dramatic surge in the volume of founders (see Naval’s post on why you will find there’s a shortage of engineers inside the Valley), which will inevitably result in many more companies being created and destroyed-capitalist creative destruction on steroids. This is not a bad thing. The net effect is positive since more product experiments will go on simultaneously, more companies achieving product-market fit, more quality created, jobs created. You will get a photo. However, it lets you do imply that a high-level founder, you are going to have to spend much more time picking your target steer clear of the “me too, also ran” syndrome. This is how you can gain more valuable Instagram followers: sneak a peek at this web-site!


However, this also fists shaking that I deemed a severe overreaction found themselves shaking up Instagram co-founder Kevin Systrom and so on the morning of December 19, he posted a blog explaining that these new Instagram terms were misinterpreted. This satiated some, but others watched it as merely pandering. Then today, when I went on Instagram to post a picture of my Venti Starbuck’s Peppermint Mocha while using edgy new Mayfair filter, I noticed on top of the interface the text “Updated Terms of Service Based on Your Feedback.” I tapped through to browse the highlighted “Because, from the feedback we now have been told by you, we have been reverting this advertising section for the original version that has been in effect since we launched the service in October 2010”. On January 19th, 2013, the revised (edited to soften the blow from last Monday) terms will be posted. Until then, you can read the full post from Kevin Systrom. A victory for social networkers everywhere? Perhaps. However, if anyone of you gets even reading the entire original Terms of Service, you can likely find some warning flag there that might scare you nonetheless.

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